Waking Up to the Possibilities

It is amazing how much I don’t notice in my surroundings. I have been to Nature’s Best Market hundreds of times but I never realized the smoothie bar utilizes solar power. At the west end of the smoothie bar there is a beautiful wall installation showing the solar input and what it is powering.

Laurie Gillies, co-owner of Nature’s Best and member of Prairie Spruce Commons, provided our community a tour of the installation. The silver-outlets are solely solar powered (the red arrow in the photo is pointing to a solar outlet). The blenders are used for hours each day so utilizing energy from the sun rather than from a coal fire generating plant provides the benefit of a delicious, nutritious smoothie, and leaves the oxygen in the air for us to breathe.

The solar radiation map for Canada makes it obvious that we have an abundance of sun in southern Saskatchewan. At Prairie Spruce we are committing to building and living in a green building that reduces energy consumption through high-efficiency fibreglass frame windows, increasing the insulation value in walls and ceilings, utilizing solar power, and using in-floor heating and cooling. Somehow, getting up close and personal with the solar installation at Nature’s Best has made what we are creating at Prairie Spruce more real to me and even more desirable.

If you want to know more about the energy consumption in your current home, you can click this link to find out the energy demands of many household appliances.

Brenda

 

Life Beyond Bigfoot

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Prairie Spruce Commons is committed to reducing our environmental footprint. Part of this commitment includes designing our building to use complementary power sources like solar power, but what does this really mean? Thanks to an information session with Ken Compton, local solar and wind energy expert, we are gaining more of an understanding of our options.

Life Beyond Bigfoot : Solar & Net-Metering

It is our intention to build so we are ready for future installation of solar voltaic panels. The panels have a 25 year life expectancy (production > 80%). We intend to produce power under Saskpower’s net-metering program.

Suncatcher Solar provides the following information about solar power output in Saskatchewan:

The amount of electricity you can produce depends on the size of the solar array and the amount of sunshine you receive in your area. For example, a solar power system with a 4.8 kW array (20 solar panels @ 240 Watts each) will produce an average of about 700 kWh per month in central Saskatchewan, Canada.  You can find out how much electricity you need by looking at your current power bills.

Why we will use complementary power sources:

  • Reducing our cost of living: S ask Power has applied for an annual rate increase of 5% for the next two years.
  • When possible, generating power for sale:  The Sask Power Net Metering Program makes this possible.
  • Reducing our CO2 production and elevating our province’s energy status: Saskatchewan generates almost 75% of our electricity from coal fired electric plants and is currently Canada’s worst polluter per capita.