Getting to Know the Neighbours

Bur Oak, photo courtesy Matt Levin, Wikimedia Commons

Cohousers are all about community, neighbourhood and lowering our carbon footprint.

As our beautiful building takes shape in Regina’s Canterbury Park neighbourhood, we are getting to know our neighbours.

A sweet arrangement has been made with our neighbours to the east at College Park II Retirement Residence (CP2). We do volunteer work at CP2 in exchange for use of their space for our meetings.

My chosen volunteer work at CP2 is watering trees and picking up garbage from the front and back gardens of this two-block property.

Trees are essential members of any neighbourhood. I notice happiness in getting to know and care for these young trees. Two of our tree neighbour species are Bur Oak and Little Leaf Linden.

Bur oak is a slow-growing, tall deciduous tree with a mature height of 30 to 45 feet and a spread of 20 feet. It has an annual growth rate of 2 to 12 inches and a lifespan of 100+ years. It is native to the eastern prairies.

Little-leaf linden (Tilia cordata) is a medium to large shade tree with a symmetrical canopy that looks at home in formal or casual landscapes. It is easy to care for and needs little or no pruning. In summer it produces clusters of fragrant yellow flowers that attract bees. In late summer, dangling clusters of nutlets replace the flowers.

Earlier this fall Brenda and I were visiting in Vancouver where Nicole my goddaughter introduced me to the Treegator watering system.  Treegators are everywhere.  I ordered one and tried it out the other day when it was still warm.

www.treegator.com

This simple watering system allows young trees to get a good drink and at the same time conserves water and that makes me happy.

Win-win-win.

Ruth

Wildlife Photographer

As a wildlife photographer I really don’t have many skills. I haven’t got a lot of patience, I haven’t got a lot of photography experience, and I like to be moving around. But on a recent trip to a vacant farm yard somewhere in Saskatchewan I finally figured out wildlife photography. You have to have wildlife subjects that want to have their pictures taken. In fact in the case of the attached picture of the moose they run right up to you, pose and give you a perfect photo, well at least by my amateur wildlife photography standards.

Then less than an hour later while walking across the same vacant yard you notice a mule deer about 25 yards away watching you walk towards her. Again as an amateur wildlife photographer with your camera now safely stowed in the truck 25 yards behind you, you do the only sensible thing to do, which is to turn around and walk back to the truck to get your camera to take some more photographs. This of course works because you have a subject that wants their picture taken. The attached mule deer photo is one of several that were taken with a co-operative wildlife subject.

I think with such great photos I will be able to join my cohousing communities elite photography group, well my fingers are crossed anyways.

Neighbours

There is something unique about being a community moving into a community. It seems many of the neighbours in and around Canterbury Park are aware of and interested in Prairie Spruce Commons Cohousing. Somehow, I feel larger than myself, or even my family, as I anticipate moving into Prairie Spruce Commons and the Canterbury Park neighbourhood. It is as though I bring the whole Prairie Spruce community with me, and this is like an open door when I am meeting the neighbours.

I have been slowly getting to know our future neighbours and neighbourhood. As a photographer, I am regularly consulting with Laurie at Bird Film. It is fun to stop in at Bib and Tucker and see what new styles Gaynor has on display, and Elyse at Stapleford Health and Rehab did her magic on my shoulder.

Our unit is at the south end of the Prairie Spruce building and the residents at Cedar Wood Manor on Broad Street will be our closest neighbours. Walter, Emmerson, and Vic (not their actual names) have a close-up view of the construction from their lawn chairs at the back of the building. They are out there most days and can give a report on the progress. It is nice to sit with them on a sunny day, see the building taking shape, and hear their perspectives on the construction and the neighbourhood. Recently I was standing looking at the east foundation (adjacent to College Park II) and met Alvin (not his actual name) who also lives at Cedar Wood. It was inspiring to hear his pride in his son who has recently graduated in medicine and is doing his residency in Prince George.

And then there is the natural world neighbours. The copse is a small group of trees at the intersection of College Street and Halifax Street, and was part of the original Anglican Diocese of Qu’Appelle.  I am grateful that the copse is being beautifully restored by Vince and Joe Fiorante.

In this time of being part of a community moving into a community there always seems to be some new opportunity to get to know one another, and ourselves, in fresh ways

Summer Social at Katepwa Lake

Sunday July 23rd was a lazy, hot, Saskatchewan Summer day. The brilliant blue sky had hardly a hint of cloud to impede the bright yellow sun bathing the cities and countryside alike in its warm glow.
This was the day twenty-two members of the Prairie Spruce Commons cohousing community took a brief hiatus from the mildly oppressive heat in Regina and headed out to the inviting micro-climate of Katepwa Lake, and Dave and Lill’s lake cottage. Everyone was in a celebratory mood and the time was right for a festive summer social.

Folks started to arrive via carpools around 2:00 p.m. They unpacked their potluck food and refreshments, ice coolers and chairs, and of course “Conan the Beagle”, and arranged themselves in friendly visiting fashion under the shade of nearby Ash and Maple trees.

Once everyone had arrived we took a brief time out for Lill’s “tour”. It started with the inside of the cottage where Dave could be heard saying “please move all the way in folks, away from the door, so everyone can get in”, just like in a “real” organized tour. Then it was on to the lake shore, the boat dock, and an assortment of water craft laid out for the visitors to use, and of course more trees.

After that everyone chose their favourite leisure activity, whether lying in the hammock, sitting and visiting, walking the dog, lying on a blanket, or using the paddle boat, and wiled away the afternoon. The snack table and beverage station were near at hand and kept well stocked but it wasn’t long before tummies started growling.
So, we fired up the barbeques (Murray had brought an extra one to provide added grill space) and it wasn’t long before everyone’s preferred form of protein was grilled to perfection. The splendid array of colorful gourmet potluck salads and desserts covered an entire picnic table. Then in typical cohousing fashion everyone settled in for the common meal and more socializing. Coincidently July 23rd was Dave and Lill’s wedding anniversary and the community honoured them with a song and a special cake for dessert. There was even time for a cake cutting “photo op”.

By 8:00 p.m. supper lethargy was wearing off and some folks started thinking about the return trip to Regina. As efficiently as they arrived they swept up their belongings, packed them into vehicles, collected their passengers and headed for home. A few people stayed to watch the beautiful sunset across the lake. It was the perfect finale to a wonderful time spent with cohousing family and friends.

Tonka Time

I used to play with Tonka trucks. In fact, they might move into Prairie Spruce Cohousing with me for the younger members and guests to use.

Last week was Tonka time at the Prairie Spruce site.

There were a couple of rainy days when the equipment could not work because it was too muddy and slippery.

June 16, 2017 – Then the digging really started.

June 21, 2017 – Here is the beginning of the parking garage.

The dirt is piled west of the site.

June 24, 2017 – Ready for the Ground Blessing Ceremony

Marc

Busy on Badham

There is a lot of action on Badham Boulevard lately. Since Marc’s photo essay, the big backhoe has been digging.

Oh my Deere!

 

Jean, Murray, Knud, Eva, Ruth, and Lois are up to something.

On any given day, there is one, or two, or more, Prairie Spruce members at the site, watching the backhoe. It is really exciting to see the manifestation of our vision. Watch our Facebook page for updates and videos.

When a group of Prairie Spruce members gets together, great things happen…and you’re invited!

 

 

Please join us for our Ground Blessing Celebration.

Hope to see you all there.

Joanne

Before Excavation…

May 31, 2017
Sunny and warm. Prairie Spruce members wait for construction
June 6, 2017
Still waiting. The sky is overcast, and our spirits are gloomy.
June 7, 2017
What a difference a day makes! The fencing has been delivered.


June 10, 2017
The paperwork has been approved. Just a few more days until excavation begins.

Photo Essay by Marc

Watch for the next photo essay documenting our progress.

Prairie Spruce – It is more than a name

Recently members of the Prairie Spruce community have been actively searching their yards at home and at the cottage for spruce tree seedlings to help a volunteer (Merle) with the Regina Ski Club. He is collecting the seedlings to eventually place by the cross country ski trails at White Butte to provide wind protection and to help with holding snow on the trails.

By Ryan Hodnett

Merle stated “this is for the future generations.” That is also the way our community feels about the building and community that we are establishing in Regina.   While we know that the community we are establishing is for us, we also know this will be a happy community for future generations when we are no longer here.

Merle, we were happy to help you and the Regina Ski Club with the seedlings. Our Prairie Spruce community envisions this as only being one of many things we will do to connect with our larger community, Regina.

The Prairie Spruce community wishes Merle happy planting for those future generations of skiers.

Murray

And So, It Begins – Part 1

I was raised as a farm girl. There were only two girls in the family, so there wasn’t much chance to be a girly-girl. I grew up picking rocks, cutting grass, riding ponies, and chasing cats. Normal attire was jeans, T-shirts, and sneakers.

I have a vivid memory of getting ready for school when I was in Grade 11. It was going to be a hot summer day, so I put on my dark green dirndl skirt and a white blouse. I carefully arranged my bright pink sweatshirt over my shoulders and headed downstairs for breakfast. When my older sister saw me, she loudly declared, “That does not go together.” I was crushed; I thought I looked great. I went back upstairs to change, probably into a pair of jeans and a T-shirt.

Fast forward 35 years or so, I still live in jeans, T-shirts, and sneakers. My professional attire is black or grey dress pants and colored tops. My sister takes me shopping every summer. If I have to shop for clothes by myself, I usually go to a nice store near the end of the day and throw myself upon the mercy of the salesperson.

I decided to repaint my bathroom once. I wanted it to be cheery and bright. I found a really nice shade of yellow and used bright blue as trim on the window and door frame because I know that yellow and blue go together. I was so proud of myself and my colorful bathroom. Right up until my friend said being in my bathroom was like being in an 

Together with my husband Henning, I have become a member of Prairie Spruce Commons Cohousing. We have recently signed a contract with Fiorante Homes, the final plans are with the City of Regina, and surveying on the site should start very soon. I was under the impression that someone (I have no idea who) would come to me one day with some swatches of fabric, cupboard doors, and some paint chips and say, “You can have a unit that is shades of brown, or “You can have a unit that is shades of grey.” I was already pretty sure I was going with the grey option, but I wanted to see what the brown one looked like.

Much to my horror, I was wrong, very wrong. There is no magic someone for me. We get a lighting budget, a flooring budget, and a kitchen cupboard budget. Henning took me to Richardson Lighting. I can buy whatever lights I want as long as the total doesn’t go over budget. No, no, no. There is too much choice. I can’t decide what I like; I only seem able to decide what I don’t like. I keep hearing my sister’s voice, “That doesn’t go together.”

I did finally find something I liked, but I’m not sure what would go with it.

I am blessed with a very patient husband. After multiple trips to Home Depot, Lowes, and Rona (going back to Richardson was too traumatizing), I have decided the following. I want a sink that has a built-in soap dispenser. I don’t want a bathtub, just a shower. My fridge needs to have an ice maker.

Luckily, Prairie Spruce is working with Richardson Lighting, Floors by Design, and Palandri Cabinets. Based on what I’ve heard about these companies and what I’ve read on the Internet , I think there is still hope for our unit. I have faith that our unit will be as beautiful as the community where I live.

If you have always dreamed of designing your own condominium and enjoy interior design, join Prairie Spruce now and create your dream home.

Maybe I can just copy your design.

Joanne

 

And So, It Begins – Part 2

A humous look at a design and family.

I freely admit I have little or no sense of style. I believe that black dress pants go with anything and that white walls are the best way to decorate. My mother-in-law is quite the opposite. She loves color and knows how to put things together. Her house is always decorated for holidays, and she dresses beautifully. We are the opposite of one another, but have learned to get along very well. This wonderful relationship we have almost didn’t happen.

It was 1993, and Henning and I were dating. It was decided that it was time I met his parents. The plan was to spend the day hanging out at the library where Henning worked, go back to his place to change, and then drive out to his parents’ farm. I’m not sure why I decided to spend the day at the library in sweatpants and a big plaid shirt, but it turned into a really bad idea when Henning had to work late and there was no time to go to his house to change. We went straight from work to the farm near Edenwold.

I vividly remember Eva, my now mother-in-law, opening the door. I was in awe. She had dark hair and glasses with red frames. She had on a red sweater, a red and black plaid skirt, black nylons, and red high heeled shoes. I turned around and told Henning we need ed to go back to Regina because I needed to change my clothes.

Eva and Knud wouldn’t hear of it. They welcomed me into their house and, as I entered the kitchen, I was blown away for a second time. Eva had set the table in true Danish fashion. There were flowers and candles. There was silverware, fine china, and wine glasses. There was a lace tablecloth and little doilies between the plates. There was even a tiny flagpole with a Danish flag on the table.

Oh my, I felt way out of my league. We had china at home, and it stayed in the china cabinet along with the silverware that my dad won curling. We had flowers from the garden in the summer, but candles? Wine? A flag? This was all new to me.

Joanne

Part 3 – Shopping with the in-laws